The Price of Success

In life, everything worth striving for comes at a cost. Whether it’s a house, pair of shoes, university degree, successful career, great relationship, inner peace or a lean healthy body, there’s always a price to pay. That price could be money, time, discomfort, courage, social disconnection (while studying or growing a business, for example) physical and emotional energy or a combination of many things.

Thirty years of working with people all looking to achieve the same outcome (positive change) tells me that, while most people have more than enough talent, time, knowledge and intelligence to turn their goals into reality, it’s a much smaller group that’s genuinely ready to pay the sometimes-messy, not-so-sexy price day in, day out. The idea of success is rarely the practical reality of it, which is why the quick-fix, instant-gratification culture (and all the associated products) continues to flourish.

With that in mind, here are four potentially life-changing questions for you:

1. What do I want (the goal)?
2. Why do I want it (the real goal)?
3. What’s the cost?
4. Am I genuinely ready to pay the price?

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{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Lynn February 21, 2014 at 1:32 am

Craig,

Thank you so much for sharing this. This message resonates with me as I’m at a crossroad in life and realize that I need to “pay the price” to get to the next level. Thanks again.

Lynn

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Lynn February 21, 2014 at 8:32 am

Craig,

Thank you so much for sharing this. This message resonates with me as I’m at a crossroad in life and realize that I need to “pay the price” to get to the next level. Thanks again.

Lynn

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Bernadette February 21, 2014 at 1:01 pm

Thanks Craig…I am always grateful for the free reminders….the price of success…the key is always much more simple than we think or make it….. kis…thank you
Berni

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Kristy February 25, 2014 at 11:35 am

Hi Craig,
I seem to constantly ponder this question and again over analyse it! If I really want to achieve a goal (in my case a weight loss/body change goal) and I believe it requires a time and physical committment which is outside my comfort zone (early starts and/or night time training to fit in around young children and work) how can I evaluate if it I am being realistic or not, if I am asking ‘to much’ of myself or not (eg if I feel ‘tired’, should I still push myself to train at 5:30am), I find it hard to tell if i am finding an excuse, or if it is too much to ask of myself.. but I guess this is totally a personal decision isn’t it? Other people do WAY more challenging things..

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Anonymous February 26, 2014 at 1:32 pm

When I think about it (both the goal and the real goal, which interestingly are different) it seems there is a heavy price to pay – in fact so heavy that I’m not sure my brain can comprehend everything that’s involved. So I’m taking tiny steps rather than huge leaps. I don’t know if I’ll ever get there, but I think that the journey is at least as important as the final outcome. I recognise that I’m addicted to comfort and feel very afraid of letting go of what I’m used to. What if the real goal I should be aiming for is peace / comfort? Though I guess there are many ways of achieving this, some involving more effort than others.. Another thing I think about is whether my goals are for myself or involve other people as well? I need to keep a grasp on what I can and can’t change. There seems to be lots of knock-on effects, where if I think differently about one thing, it has unexpected consequences in the way I think about various other things as well – this takes some getting used to (if I ever can) and in fact I need to be careful that I’m not just aimlessly thinking round in circles, without ever getting anywhere. (I recognise this as a sign of my schizophrenia, particularly when I get hung up on religious issues). Hope this makes sense.

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